Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) is a major study following the development of 10,000 children and families from all parts of Australia. The study commenced in 2004 with two cohorts - families with 4-5 year old children and families with 0-1 year old infants. Growing Up in Australia is investigating the contribution of children's social, economic and cultural environments to their adjustment and wellbeing. A major aim is to identify policy opportunities for improving support for children and their families and for early intervention and prevention strategies.

data.growingupinaustralia.gov.au

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Jennifer Min
Play Streets

Children in Hackney are reclaiming the streets, thanks to a groundbreaking scheme enabling residents to close residential streets for a few hours to through traffic, turning them into play streets. 

hackney.gov.uk

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Jennifer Min
Urban Network living

The Urban Taskforce has commissioned McCrindle to undertake research into apartment lifestyles in Sydney and to compare this with detached house living. Their report titled “Sydney Lifestyle Study - Redefining Sydney's urban lifestyles” uses 2016 Census data and an online survey of 1,500 Sydneysiders representing apartment dwellers and detached house dwellers to understand the demographic profile and characteristics of people living in apartments in Sydney.

January 2018

UrbanTaskforce

Sydney Lifestyle Study - Redefining Sydney's urban lifestyles

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Jennifer Min
Cities Alive: Designing for Urban Childhoods

A child-friendly approach to urban planning is a vital part of creating inclusive cities that work better for everyone. Designing for urban childhoods inspires us to respond positively to the challenges, and sets out actions that can help take us to a more child-friendly future – moving well beyond simply providing playgrounds.

2017

arup.com

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Jennifer Min
The child as an indicator species for cities: reflections on Philadelphia

13-years ago, the British writer and researcher Tim Gill coined the term ‘battery-reared children’ to warn of the impact of poor spatial planning on modern childhoods. He has often spoken since of the need to see children’s play and independent mobility as a measure of the liveability of our towns and cities. This blog begins with his opinion piece from the Philadelphia Enquirer, coinciding with his trip to the US city, and is followed by his reflections on the visit.

by Tim Gill
2017

Child in the City

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Jennifer Min
Homes for People : housing strategy

This Housing Strategy, Homes for People, is an evidence based strategy to enable Melbourne City to achieve their  “established aspiration for an inner and central city where housing is affordable, well-designed and meets the diverse needs of our residents.”

It notes that “While projected growth of family households is relatively low, many of the inner city schools are at, or close to, capacity suggesting more families with children are moving into the central city than market-led projections.”
by City of Melbourne
2014-2018

Homes for People : Housing Strategy

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Jennifer Min
Vertical Living Kids – Creating supportive high rise environments for children in Melbourne

This report presents the findings of “Vertical Living Kids”, an 18 month research project which ran from July 2008 to December 2009 and was funded by the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation (VicHealth). The research had two objectives: to explore the physical and social environmental determinants of Children’s Independent Mobility (CIM - the ability of children, in this case children aged 8-12, to autonomously explore public space) in central Melbourne high rise housing; and to uncover international best practice planning policy for these communities.

by Whitzman, C. and Mizrachi, D.
2009

Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, University of Melbourne.

Vertical Living Kids

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Jennifer Min
Guidelines for Children in the Outdoor Residential Environment

This Working Paper provides a set of guidelines for the design of the outdoor environments at

Burswood Lakes to accommodate the needs of children in the ‘middle childhood’ age range
(ages five to twelve) they have been designed to assist Mirvac Fini and it’s consultants in the
preparation of the landscape Master Plan for this site.

by Dr Wendy Sarkissian and Yollana Shore
with Sam La Rocca
2003

Guidelines for Children in the OutdoorResidential Environment

Dr Wendy Sarkissian Website

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Jennifer Min
designing with children

This website aims to inspire design practitioners and bring together in dialogue anyone interested in exploring how children's cultures, capacities and imagination may have an impact upon the design profession, design process and ultimately the built environment.

2011

Designing with Children

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Jennifer Min